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29 Oct 2005 - 22:01

today's caption contest



hatemath135.jpg


bonus item

But not everyone hates math. About 25 percent of those surveyed said it was their favorite subject, which is about the same number who chose English and history. Slightly less chose science. Of course, math is one of those subjects that appeals to people who like clear cut answers. One plus one is two. Those who find such a black and white process overwhelming, prefer subjects that have a bit of gray and allow for interpretation and debate.

The favorite high school subject of the author of this passage was:
a) math
b) social studies
c) Auditorium



bonus bonus

Those who find such a black and white process overwhelming, prefer subjects that have a bit of gray and allow for interpretation and debate.

Why has the author of this passage placed a comman between the words 'overwhelming' and 'prefer'?


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I'm not sure I can come up with a caption for that photo that is appropriate for a family website.

That's a disturbing picture.

-- DougSundseth - 29 Oct 2005


What do you think her special number is?

-- KDeRosa - 29 Oct 2005


LOL

OK, that is BORDERLINE appropriate for a family web site.

-- CatherineJohnson - 29 Oct 2005


"Why has the author of this passage placed a comman between the words 'overwhelming' and 'prefer'?"

--she's allowing for a bit of interpretation and debate.

-- SusanS - 29 Oct 2005


And let me just say that the reason so many hate math is because they can't do it, and not because they need to have it be more FUN. Someone needs to break these people's notion that fun and effective learning always go together.

-- SusanS - 29 Oct 2005


Apropos of this article, please see the comment I put here.

-- CarolynJohnston - 29 Oct 2005


Why has the author of this passage placed a comman between the words 'overwhelming' and 'prefer'?

Because for her the rules of grammar are not black and white but subject to interpretation.

-- KDeRosa - 29 Oct 2005


What does it say on her T-shirt? It isn't b^2 - 4ac is it?

Well, at least she's in a class that is teaching the derivation of the quadratic equation, albeit a rather black and white topic. So black and white it is hardly taught anymore.

-- BarryGarelick - 29 Oct 2005


we have a winner!

Why has the author of this passage placed a comman between the words 'overwhelming' and 'prefer'?

Because for her the rules of grammar are not black and white but subject to interpretation.

contributed, by
K,DeRosa

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


I would LOVE to know the derivation of this photo.

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


Also, I don't necessarily get the feeling that the author is a woman...but I'm not sure why.

Isn't there some web site that detects the sex of prose passages?

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


I am a Googling GOD (insider wrestling joke)



gendergenie.jpg


Gender Genie

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


Computer program detects author gender by Philip Ball

Simple algorithm suggests words and syntax bear sex and genre stamp.

A new computer program can tell whether a book was written by a man or a woman. The simple scan of key words and syntax is around 80% accurate on both fiction and non-fiction1,2.

The program's success seems to confirm the stereotypical perception of differences in male and female language use. Crudely put, men talk more about objects, and women more about relationships.

Female writers use more pronouns (I, you, she, their, myself), say the program's developers, Moshe Koppel of Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel, and colleagues. Males prefer words that identify or determine nouns (a, the, that) and words that quantify them (one, two, more).

So this article would already, through sentences such as this, have probably betrayed its author as male: there is a prevalence of plural pronouns (they, them), indicating the male tendency to categorize rather than personalize.

If I were female, the researchers imply, I'd be more likely to write sentences like this, which assume that you and I share common knowledge or engage us in a direct relationship. These differing styles have previously been called 'informational' and 'involved', respectively.

Koppel and colleagues trained their algorithm on a few test cases to identify the most prevalent fingerprints of gender and of fiction and non-fiction. They then set it searching for these fingerprints in 566 English-language works in a variety of genres, ranging from A Guide to Prague to A. S. Byatt's novel Possession - which, intriguingly, the programme misclassified by gender, along with Kazuo Ishiguro's The Remains of the Day.

Strikingly, the distinctions between male and female writers are much the same as those that, even more clearly, differentiate non-fiction and fiction. The programme can tell these two genres apart with 98% accuracy. This is perhaps unsurprising, given that non-fiction is more informational and fiction more involved.

Most of the works studied were published after 1975. The Israeli team now intends to probe whether the differences extend further back in time - and so whether George Eliot was wasting her time disguising herself with a male nom de plume - and also whether they occur in other languages.

References

1. Koppel, M., Argamon, S. & Shimoni, A. R. Automatically categorizing written texts by author gender. Literary and Linguistic Computing, in the press, (2003).
2.Argamon, S., Koppel, M., Fine, J. & Shimoni, A. R. Gender, genre, and writing style in formal written texts. Text, in the press, (2003).

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


Gender genie!

What a cool idea!

-- CarolynJohnston - 30 Oct 2005


Is that cool!

Take the Test

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


August 10, 2003
Take the Test

Take any piece of fiction and do the following:

1. Count the number of words in the document.

2. For each appearance in the document of the following words ADD the number of points indicated:
'the' (17)
'a' (6)
'some' (6)
any number, written in digits or in words (5)
'it' (2)

3. For each appearance in the document of the following words SUBTRACT the number of points indicated:
'with' (14)
possessives, ending in 's' (5)
possessive pronouns, such as 'mine', 'yours', 'his', 'hers', (3)
'for' (4)
'not' or any word ending with 'n't' (4)

4. If the total score (after adding and subtracting as indicated) is greater than the total number of words in the document, then the author of the document is probably a male. Otherwise, the author is probably a female.

Courtesy of Moshe Koppel, Bar-Ilan University, Israel, and Shlomo Argamon, Illinois Institute of Technology

Take the Test

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


I love it!

You get 5 points for ANY number.

In digits or in words, doesn't matter.

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


I love it that Larry Summers gets creamed, and meanwhile the NEW YORK TIMES has been running this stuff for years.

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


Gender Genie links for politics

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


I ran Susan's post here through the gender genie and it thought she was a guy!

But I ran my post on adding significant digits through it as well, fulling expecting it would think I was a guy, and it didn't.

I guess I write sensitively and empathetically about math. And Susan... well let's just say maybe her ring finger is long. ;-)

-- CarolynJohnston - 30 Oct 2005


Uh-oh

gendergenie1.jpg

gendergenie2.jpg

gendergenie3.jpg

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


converging lines of evidence

1. Ruthless: 80
2. Ring finger: long
3. Gender genie: male score 85, female score 74



I'm a guy.


-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


I'm gonna have to get my Family Photo scanned in pronto.

The one with the super-blonde hair.

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


Catherine

I entered another post of yours, the stuff you wrote at the bottom of the SusanOnParents post.

The Gender Genie gives odds of 8 to 5 based on that passage that you're a guy.

I would run some more tests first, but I think it's safe to say that you write like a guy!

-- CarolynJohnston - 30 Oct 2005


I ran my engineering school essay:

Words: 1373
Female Score: 1905
Male Score: 1994

The Gender Genie thinks the author of this passage is: male!

Turns out I'm not as male as my crazy finger sizes lead me to believe.

-- KDeRosa - 30 Oct 2005


Wow, Ken, we must have been doing that at the same instant.

Wait. How come I got a completely different score????

Words: 1373
Female Score: 2109
Male Score: 3279

-- CarolynJohnston - 30 Oct 2005


Hmm, I suspect the Gender genie is a fraud.

-- KDeRosa - 30 Oct 2005


wait, I ran it as nonfiction.

-- KDeRosa - 30 Oct 2005


So I'm a very male blogger but a nancy-boy non-fiction writer.

-- KDeRosa - 30 Oct 2005


Maybe you get an extra 1000 or so male points just for being a blogger.

-- CarolynJohnston - 30 Oct 2005


wait

was there a blogging category?

am I losing my mind?

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


I have zero metacognitive awareness.

When I was taking the General test, I was thinking, 'Hey, I do have tactical intelligence! I'm giving tactical answers!'

Then splat.

Next when I was contemplating the Gender Genie, I was thinking, I'm a serious girlie writer, what with all my pronouns & qualifying this-isn't-fact-checked phrases & all.....

Splat again.

Maybe I should take some time off to find myself.

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


Harry Hutton has found himself:

As you know, I recently went to South America to find myself. I needn't have bothered- I was in Bayswater all the time. I pulled back the duvet this morning and there I was, in person.

I'm happy for him.

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


I think the General test was testing whether you were more a tactical general, i.e., back at the command post rather than a frontline fighter, than whether you were emplying sound military tactics.

-- KDeRosa - 30 Oct 2005


Oh come on, the tactics score was the only score I did well on. Don't tell me it was only because I'm a weenie.

-- CarolynJohnston - 30 Oct 2005


I think the scores interacted somewhat, some questions made you chose between being tactical or being up at the front (I'm thinking this boosted guts)

-- KDeRosa - 30 Oct 2005


So, if my theory holds, doing well in the tactics category just further proves your weeniness.

-- KDeRosa - 30 Oct 2005


My weeniness needs no further proof, I'm afraid.

-- CarolynJohnston - 30 Oct 2005


back at the command post rather than a frontline fighter

in my case I don't think that holds up, because I put myself at the command post in every question that had a command post

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


I also said I wasn't willing to die to save 12 innocent people, or whatever it was.

And that I wasn't willing to have someone I love die for 12 innocent people.

Basically, my attitude was: I would like the enemy to die, not me.

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


Just noticed another sexed texts web site.

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


Are Women Writers Inferior

(I'm dropping these links in so I don't lose them--no idea whether there's any reason to read this...)

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


Basically, my attitude was: I would like the enemy to die, not me.

Catherine channels Patton: "The object is not to die for one's country, it's to make the other poor son of a bitch die for his"

-- KDeRosa - 30 Oct 2005


Isn't there a well known biography or autobiography of Patton? Should I read it? I'm almost done with Ben Franklin's autobiography and trying to decide what to read next.

-- LesleyStevens - 30 Oct 2005


"I also said I wasn't willing to die to save 12 innocent people, or whatever it was.

And that I wasn't willing to have someone I love die for 12 innocent people."

Same here, so it can't have affected the tactics scores.

-- CarolynJohnston - 30 Oct 2005


Catherine channels Patton: "The object is not to die for one's country, it's to make the other poor son of a bitch die for his"

I love it!

Yeah, that sounds right to me.

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


Right, tactics is something else.....

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


I ran the quadratic equations page I did through the gender genie. It's a non-fiction blog post, so I tried it both ways.

As a blog post:

Words: 443 (NOTE: The genie works best on texts of more than 500 words.)

Female Score: 413 Male Score: 1147

The Gender Genie thinks the author of this passage is: male!

As non-fiction:

Words: 443 (NOTE: The genie works best on texts of more than 500 words.)

Female Score: 719 Male Score: 547

The Gender Genie thinks the author of this passage is: female!

I don't know what that means.

-- DougSundseth - 30 Oct 2005


good grief

-- CatherineJohnson - 30 Oct 2005


I don't see how this could be acurate for fiction. If a guy writes about female characters, using the words her or hers, he'll get "female" points.

I put in the first act of Shakespeare's Anthony and Cleopatra, and it decided overwhelmingly that the author was female.

-- AndyJoy - 31 Oct 2005


But that's a play... the author is consciously trying to speak like the characters in the play.

-- CarolynJohnston - 31 Oct 2005

WebLogForm
Title: today's caption contest
TopicType: WebLog
SubjectArea: HumorAndSayings
LogDate: 200510291800